The Daily Camera

 

This series is dedicated towards inspiring and educating people on how to approach photography differently, whether through a dedicated camera or smartphone.

 

Part 05 coming mid 2019

Part 04

Published early 2017
Shot on iPhone 7
Edited with VSCO Cam

Union Square, New York City

Union Square, New York City

c6 PRESET

I wanted to utilise the atmosphere by composing the image from a stark angle. I added a bit of sharpness on the coat with Lightroom's local adjustments to draw its texture out.

Kips Bay, New York City

Kips Bay, New York City

c8 PRESET

The analogous colours from the subjects shoes, briefcase, and pavement drew me to take the image.

Eileen; Chinatown, New York City

Eileen; Chinatown, New York City

b3 PRESET

I wanted to apply a black and white preset so I could draw attention to individual textures through the high contrast you get from black and white images. From the street to the building, I was able to give every object its own distinct character.

Harlem, New York City

e1 PRESET

Movement not only can give your image energy, but also juxtaposition between subjects. Objects—such as the basketball court lines—aid the viewer to focus on one subject at a time.

Harlem, New York City

Harlem, New York City

b3 Preset

Be patient for the scene to reveal a fleeting moment. And if you have to, hide your camera as discretely as you can to capture that moment.

Madison Square Garden, New York City

Madison Square Garden, New York City

e1 PRESET

Find various angles to capture the scene in an intimate, engaging manner.

Detroit, Michigan

Detroit, Michigan

NO PRESET

Explore the relationship between light and colours or in this case, the lack of colours. Harsh lighting usually compliments textures and tones in black and white images. I used ProCam 4 for manually adjusting the shutter speed while determining the right ISO value so I could have a sharp, clean image. I then handled all the post processing on Lightroom so I could adjust the desired tonality.

Olivia Bee; Brooklyn, New York City

Olivia Bee; Brooklyn, New York City

e4 PRESET

Prominent lines can subconsciously lead your view towards the subject. Using both negative and positive space can give your images subject a stark precense.

Ada; Central Park, New York City

Ada; Central Park, New York City

e1 PRESET

Use movement to create energy in an image, which can either compliment or contrast the environments mood.

I used ProCam 4 to manually focus on Ada's face because I wanted to naturally capture her expression once she turned around. I set a specific shutter speed value while complimenting it with an appropriate ISO value so I would have a well-exposed image.

Detroit, Michigan

Detroit, Michigan

c9 Preset

I usually bring the hues in greens down to a yellower tint so that anything green in the image—usually grass—doesn't distract the viewer from the subject.

Central Park, New York City

Central Park, New York City

E2 PRESET

The E1-E8 presets favour creamy highlights and deep shadows that compliment any image with warm tones. 

Kips Bay, New York City

Kips Bay, New York City

C7 Preset

The subjects hair complimented her coats colour and texture, which helped me frame an image that focused on them while capturing the atmosphere.

Upper East Side, New York City

Upper East Side, New York City

e1 PRESET

Loud colours allow the viewer to separate objects from one another. You can use this to your advantage when you want the subject to be noticeable among a cluttered environment.

Upper East Side, New York City

Upper East Side, New York City

C8 PRESET

Pay attention to subjects that can compliment each other. I followed the subject on the right for a few feet, aware that there was another subject wearing a similar outfit.

Upper West Side, New York City

Upper West Side, New York City

e4 PRESET

I often use local adjustments on Lightroom to draw attention to certain areas of the photo with sharpness.

New Jersey

New Jersey

b3 PRESET

You can add grain along with a black and white preset to give your image a timeless mood. 

Upper East Side, New York City

Upper East Side, New York City

E1 PRESET

Shooting RAW let's me significantly fix and enhance different elements in the photo. From the skies highlights—which were brought down here—to bringing up the shadows, I'm able to make enough changes that'll let me achieve desired results that I wouldn't if I shot JPEG images.

Livonia, Michigan

Livonia, Michigan

NO PRESET

Using Lightroom let me bring out the deep shadows while retaining the midtones and highlights.

New York City

New York City

C8 PRESET

Just your casual #windowseat photo.

Upper East Side, New York City

Upper East Side, New York City

e4 Preset

The contrast between the taxis and the subjects outfit provides a distinct juxtaposition.

Millennium Park, Chicago, IL

Millennium Park, Chicago, IL

B3 PRESET

Create mystery in an image by shooting the subject at an unconventional angle. You can then use black and white to heighten an images mystique.

Chicago, Illinois

Chicago, Illinois

c6 PRESET

Vivid colours can change the images mood if you pay attention to how they compliment the subject, environment, or tones.

Livonia, Michigan

Livonia, Michigan

e1 PRESET

Entertain the idea of using shadows to bring out bright areas of an image.

Upper West Side, New York City

Upper West Side, New York City

e4 PRESET

I used the light from a nearby billboard to illuminate the texture from the rain in order to light the subject. The ad placed on the bust stop gave the rain colour which complimented the scenes mood. Be aware of the ways your environments lighting can pronounce the images mood.

Harlem, New York City

Harlem, New York City

b3 PRESET

Play with possible angles to give your subjects scale. This'll present the viewer with an obvious hierarchy if distinct colours aren't present.

Parts 01-03

The following parts have been archived.